Turkish Troops Enter Syria in Bid to Oust Kurdish Militia

إقرأ هذا الخبر بالعربية W460

Turkish ground troops entered Syria on Sunday to push an offensive against Kurdish militia as France warned the operation risked harming the international fight against jihadists.

Turkey on Saturday launched operation "Olive Branch" seeking to oust from the Afrin region of northern Syria the Peoples' Protection Units (YPG) which Ankara considers a terror group.

But the campaign risks further increasing tensions with Turkey's NATO ally the United States -- which has supported the YPG in the fight against Islamic State jihadists -- and also needs at least the tacit support of Russia to succeed.

France's defense minister sounded the sternest Western warning to Turkey since the start of the offensive, saying it risked harming the campaign to crush Islamic State (IS) jihadists.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said troops crossed into the YPG-controlled region in Syria at 0805 GMT, the Dogan news agency reported.

Turkish artillery and war planes pounded YPG sites around Afrin and total of 153 targets, including YPG refuges and weapons stores have now been hit, according to the army.

The state-run Anadolu news agency said the Turkish troops, whose number was not specified, were advancing alongside forces from the pro-Ankara rebel Free Syrian Army (FSA) and were already five kilometers (three miles) inside Syria.

In his first comments on the offensive since it began, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan expressed hope the "operation will be finished in a very short time" and vowed "we will not take a step back."

Following calls from some Turkish pro-Kurdish politicians for people to take to the streets, he warned that anyone protesting in Turkey against the operation would pay "a heavy price."

- Second Syria incursion -

The operation is Turkey's second major incursion into Syria during the seven-year civil war after the August 2016-March 2017 Euphrates Shield campaign in an area to the east of Afrin against both the YPG and IS.

The army said IS was also being targeted in this operation although it no longer has any major presence in the Afrin area.

Erdogan had repeatedly vowed that Turkey would root out the "nests of terror" in Syria of the YPG, which Ankara accuses of being the Syrian offshoot of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK).

The PKK, which has waged a rebellion in the Turkish southeast for more than three decades, is regarded as a terror group not just by Ankara and but also its Western allies.

Afrin is an enclave of YPG control, cut off from the longer strip of northern Syria that the group controls to the east extending to the Iraqi border. Turkey wants the YPG to retreat east of the Euphrates River.

Yildirim was quoted as saying that the Turkish forces aimed to create a security zone some 30 kilometers (18 miles) deep inside Syria.

The YPG said that after the first strikes on Saturday 10 people were killed, including seven civilians. The Turkish army said there were casualties but insisted they were all members either of the YPG or the PKK.

A YPG spokesman claimed that the Turkish forces had sought to enter Afrin "but we blocked the attack."

In a sign of the risks to Turkey, four rockets fired by the YPG hit the border town of Kilis early Sunday, damaging one building and lightly wounding a woman.

- 'Russian green light?' -

Turkey risks entering a diplomatic minefield with its action in Syria and the foreign ministry lost no time in inviting the ambassadors of all major powers to be briefed on the offensive.

The ministry said it had even informed Damascus through its Istanbul consulate. But the Syrian regime, which is at odds with Turkey, strongly denied this and President Bashar al-Assad slammed the offensive as "support for terrorism."

There was no immediate comment from the United States on the offensive but ahead of its launch a senior State Department official had raised concerns it risked being harmful for security in the region.

French Defense Minister Florence Parly said the fighting "must stop" as it could deter YPG fighters helping the international coalition against IS.

"Our priority is the fight against terrorism," Parly told France 3 television.

Crucial is the attitude of Russia, which has a military presence in the area and is also working with Turkey on a drive to end the civil war.

The Russian foreign ministry voiced concern and urged Turkey to show restraint. And the defense ministry said its troops were withdrawing from the Afrin area to ensure their security and prevent any "provocation."

Timur Akhmetov, Ankara-based researcher at the Russian International Affairs Council, told AFP that Russia appeared to have given the "green light" to the operation but made clear it should not lead to destabilization elsewhere.

Comments 4
Thumb eagledawn 21 January 2018, 17:08

Turkish artillery and war planes pounded YPG sites around Afrin and total of 153 targets, including YPG refuges and weapons stores have now been hit, according to the army.

"gigahabib:
What matters is what happens next time your Sultan tries to bomb the Kurds."

Thumb enterprise 22 January 2018, 03:08

yeah, the smart aleck gigahabil and his obnoxious comments should now tell us what happens.

Thumb whyaskwhy 21 January 2018, 21:55

This could not be true, did we not read the Syrian government state they would not let the Turks on their soil?. No this has to be the yids fake propaganda lol.

Missing cedars 22 January 2018, 01:34

Assad does not exist anymore. That land belong to Russia then Iran then turkey then Islamist then Assad followers.