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Raise your Glass to Oenococcus Oeni, a Real Wine Bug

Chateau Paradise or Chateau Rotgut?

Why is it that one wine can be exquisitely smooth, and another stomach-turningly tart?

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Greenpeace Accuses P&G over Indonesian Forest Destruction

Environmental group Greenpeace on Wednesday accused U.S. consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble of responsibility for the destruction of Indonesian rain-forests and the habitat of endangered orangutans and tigers.

In an extensive new report, Greenpeace said the company was using Indonesian palm oil from suppliers with links to the destruction of ancient rain-forest, haze-inducing forest fires and an orangutan "graveyard".

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French Organic Winemaker Takes Pesticides Battle to Court

A Burgundy winemaker who has defied a government order to use pesticides in his organic vineyard said Monday he was being treated like a healthy person forced to undergo chemotherapy.

Emmanuel Giboulot, whose case has become a cause celebre among environmentalists, theoretically risked a six-month prison term and a fine of up to 30,000 euros ($41,000) as he appeared in court on Monday.

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U.S. High Court Mulls Greenhouse Gas Limits

The U.S. government defended its regulation of greenhouse gas emissions from power plants before the Supreme Court on Monday, after coming under attack from industry and Republicans alike.

The top court is not expected to rule until June on the policy, which requires new power plants, factories and other stationary industrial sites to use the latest energy-efficient technologies.

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New Haul of Exotic Animals Seized in Philippines

Wildlife authorities said Tuesday they had seized nearly 100 exotic animals that had been smuggled into the southern Philippines in the second such haul in just two weeks.

Among the creatures confiscated were 66 wild birds including a rare Pesquet's parrot as well as assorted reptiles and mammals such as a long-beaked echidna, a Malayan box turtle and 10 sugar gliders -- squirrel-like animals that can glide from tree to tree.

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Gasping for a Laugh as China Smog Persists

Pollution-weary residents of smog-hit Beijing turned to black humor to help cope with grueling conditions Tuesday as a large swathe of China was covered by a thick blanket of haze for a sixth consecutive day.

Meanwhile President Xi Jinping was pictured taking a walk on a Beijing street, in the latest instance of Chinese authorities seeking to portray themselves as close to ordinary citizens.

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Australian Inquiry Finds Reef Board Mining Conflict 'Unfounded'

An inquiry has found that two members of the board which manages Australia's Great Barrier Reef have no conflict of interest despite links to the resources sector, Environment Minister Greg Hunt said Monday.

Hunt in October ordered an independent inquiry into claims that the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) had relaxed its stance on industrial development because of ties to the coal and gas industry.

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Dutch Scientists Flap to the Future with 'Insect' Drone

Dutch scientists have developed the world's smallest autonomous flapping drone, a dragonfly-like beast with 3-D vision that could revolutionize our experience of everything from pop concerts to farming.

"This is the DelFly Explorer, the world's smallest drone with flapping wings that's able to fly around by itself and avoid obstacles," its proud developer Guido de Croon of the Delft Technical University told Agence France Presse.

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Study: Volcanoes Helped Offset Man-Made Warming

Volcanoes spewing Sun-reflecting particles into the atmosphere have partly offset the effects of Man's carbon emissions over a 15-year period that has become a global-warming battleground, researchers said Sunday.

A so-called hiatus in warming since 1998 has pitched climate skeptics against mainstream scientists.

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Study: Earth's Crust at Least 4.4 bn Years Old

A microscopic grain of Earth's oldest known mineral has been dated to 4.4 billion years ago, shedding light on our planet's infancy and how it came to harbor life, researchers said Sunday.

The finding proves that Earth remained a fiery ball covered in a magma ocean for a shorter period of time after its creation than previously thought.

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