Science
Latest stories
Lebanon Joins Scientific Research on Early Tsunami Alert

Lebanon will take part on Wednesday in a scientific research that will enable scientists to trigger an early tsunami alert before it occurs.

“Lebanon will participate in a new scientific research that includes several countries in the region in an attempt to issue an early tsunami alert,” chairman of the National Research Council Moein Hamza told Voice of Lebanon radio on Wednesday.

W140 Full Story
Latest Hunt Finds Specific IQ Genes Still Elusive,

Scientists who hunt for "intelligence genes" used to think there were fewer than half a dozen of them.

In recent years, they determined there may be at least 1,000 — each with just a tiny effect on the differences in people's IQ. A study released Tuesday found new evidence that many genes play a role in intelligence, but scientists still couldn't pinpoint the specific genes involved.

W140 Full Story
Study Finds that Meteorites Carried Life's Building Blocks to Earth

A new analysis of carbon meteorites suggests that they likely carried some of the building blocks needed for DNA to the Earth, according to a NASA-funded study published on Monday.

The research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences adds weight to the long-debated theory that at least some of the materials needed to make early life forms came to our planet via meteorites.

W140 Full Story
NASA Funds 30 New Space Research Projects

The U.S. space agency announced funding for 30 new space projects Monday, including ways to protect astronauts from deep-space radiation, eliminate space debris and improve spacesuit technology.

Each of the proposals will get $100,000 in funding for a one-year period as part of NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC), the agency said in a statement.

W140 Full Story
Exploding Meteor Wakes Niue with a Start

An exploding meteor was believed to be responsible for a huge bang that reverberated around the Pacific island nation of Niue last week, police said Monday.

Niue police chief Mark Chenery said the loud bang on Wednesday night woke the island's 1,200 residents and he initially thought a boat had exploded in the harbor.

W140 Full Story
Earth's Two Moons? It's Not Lunacy, but New Theory

In a spectacle that might have beguiled poets, lovers and songwriters if only they had been around to see it, Earth once had two moons, astronomers now think. But the smaller one smashed into the other in what is being called the "big splat."

The result: Our planet was left with a single bulked-up and ever-so-slightly lopsided moon.

W140 Full Story
20-Million-Year-Old Ape Skull Unearthed in Uganda

A team of Ugandan and French paleontologists announced Tuesday they had found a 20-million-year-old ape skull in northeastern Uganda, saying it could shed light on the region's evolutionary history.

"This is the first time that the complete skull of an ape of this age has been found ... it is a highly important fossil and it will certainly put Uganda on the map in terms of the scientific world," Martin Pickford, a paleontologist from the College de France in Paris, told journalists in Kampala.

W140 Full Story
Scientists Stunned by Surface of Asteroid Vesta

The first close-up pictures of the massive asteroid Vesta reveal a northern hemisphere littered with craters — including a trio nicknamed "Snowman" — and a smoother southern half, researchers reported Monday.

Running along the asteroid's equator are deep grooves — a surprise to scientists who did not expect to see such features.

W140 Full Story
NASA's Juno to Circle Jupiter for 'Planetary Recipe'

The U.S. space agency plans to launch next week a solar-powered spacecraft called Juno that will journey to the gassy planet of Jupiter in search of how the huge, stormy giant was formed.

The $1.1 billion unmanned orbiter is scheduled for launch on August 5 -- the start of a five-year odyssey toward the solar system's most massive planet in the hopes that it will be able to circle Jupiter for a period of a year.

W140 Full Story
'Trojan' Asteroid Shares Earth's Orbit

Earth is not alone in its orbit around the Sun - a small 'Trojan' asteroid sits in front of our planet and leads it, according to British science revue Nature, which published the discovery Thursday.

This diminutive asteroid has a diameter of just 300 meters but is called a Trojan because of its particular position in a stable spot either in front of a planet or behind it. Because the asteroid and planet are constantly on the same orbit, they can never collide.

W140 Full Story