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Huawei Rejects Reports of Security Weakness

Chinese tech giant Huawei on Wednesday rejected suggestions its telecoms equipment is vulnerable to hacking and forecast a rise in 2013 profit of nearly 50 percent.

Chief financial officer Cathy Meng rejected as "groundless" reports that Huawei equipment might be more vulnerable to security threats than telecoms infrastructure made by other companies.

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Report: NSA Maps Pathway into Computers

The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world — but not in the United States — that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

The Times cited NSA documents, computer experts and U.S. officials in its report about the use of secret technology using radio waves to gain access to computers that other countries have tried to protect from spying or cyberattacks. The software network could also create a digital highway for launching cyberattacks, the Times reported.

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Facebook Grabs Social Network Branch

Facebook on Monday confirmed that it has grabbed a hold of Branch, a social network that focuses providing online forums for insightful conversations.

Terms of the deal were not released, but some reports estimated the price at $15 million.

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SimCity Coming Down from the 'Cloud'

Hugely popular SimCity will be coming down from the cloud, letting fans play the rich world simulation game without needing to be connected to the Internet.

Electronic Art's Maxis studio in Northern California put out word Monday that the eagerly-awaited modification to the game will be part of a free software update.

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Twitter Desktop Website Gets Mobile Look

Twitter revamped its desktop webpages Monday to better mirror the experience of visiting the popular one-to-many text messaging service on smartphones.

The change comes as people increasingly take to visiting online social networks and other online venues from mobile devices instead of laptop or desktop computers.

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The Hottest Gadgets of CES: 3-D Printers to 4K TVs

The biggest gadget trade show in the Americas wrapped up on Friday in Las Vegas after swamping the city with 150,000 attendees. This year, "wearable" computing was big, along with various 3-D technologies, especially 3-D printing.

Wearable devices in the shape of smartwatches and head-mounted displays have been a staple of the show for a long time, but manufacturers were excited this year because the field is finally gaining traction with consumers. Fitness bands were a breakout hit last year. The 3-D printing section bustled with activity, and it was clear that even though most people won't be buying a printer any time soon, they may be enjoying 3-D printed products, such as jewelry, wedding cakes and dental braces, in the near future. Meanwhile, TV makers were heartened by the support they received for their new ultra-high-definition TV sets.

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Technology Aims for Perfect Jump Shot, Golf Swing

A connected basketball promises to improve your jump shot. Embedded sensors which gather and analyze data offer hope for a better swing in golf, baseball or tennis.

The worlds of sports and technology came together this week at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show, highlighting ways science can help improve performance for the weekend warrior or professional athlete.

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Homes Become Members of the Family with Smart Parts

Appliances are becoming part of the family, weighing in with insights while helping with chores from cooking to doing laundry.

Home networks that allowed household items such as lamps, thermostats and locks get "smart" with Internet connections and computing power were among trends gaining steam at the Consumer Electronics Show that ends here Friday.

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Internet of Things Poses New Security Risks

The hackers who got into your computer or smartphone are now taking aim at the Internet of Things.

The connected toothbrush, sports gear with embedded sensors and smart refrigerators are just a few of the objects showcasing innovations at the Consumer Electronics Show.

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Smartphones Replace Keys in Smart Door Locks

Gabriel Bestard-Ribas got tired of his house keys scratching his smartphone in his pocket, so he combined them.

The result was a Goji lock, which senses when a resident's smartphone is near and not only unlocks a door but greets the resident by name.

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