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Novak Djokovic Wins Rogers Cup

Top-ranked Novak Djokovic won the Rogers Cup on Sunday for his ninth tournament victory of the year and record fifth in a season in an ATP Masters 1,000 event, beating Mardy Fish 6-2, 3-6, 6-4.

The 24-year-old Serb, the Australian Open and Wimbledon champion, is 29-0 this year on hard courts and 53-1 overall. He also won the Rogers Cup in 2007.

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Serena Williams Beats Stosur, Wins Rogers Cup

Eight weeks into her comeback, Serena Williams not only believes she can be as good as she once was. She can be better.

The 29-year-old American star made a pretty good point by capturing the Rogers Cup in commanding fashion Sunday, dispatching 10th-seed Samantha Stosur of Australia 6-4, 6-2 for her first Canadian crown since 2001.

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Hollywood Studio Partners with China Moviemakers

Hollywood studio Relativity Media says it is partnering with two companies to make Chinese films for global audiences and distribute movies in the fast growing Chinese market.

The partnership teams Relativity with private equity firm SAIF Partners and IDG China Media, an investment arm of Boston-based International Data Group.

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During 'Elvis Week,' Fans Remember Pivotal Year

Elvis Presley fans love an anniversary.

Every year, thousands of Elvis devotees flock to Memphis to remember the singer's death on Aug. 16, 1977. The main event of "Elvis Week" is the solemn candlelight vigil at Graceland, his longtime home, at midnight Tuesday.

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Old Text, New Wrinkles: Did Butch Cassidy Survive?

Did Butch Cassidy, the notorious Old West outlaw who most historians believe perished in a 1908 shootout in Bolivia, actually survive that battle and live to old age, peacefully and anonymously, in Washington state? And did he pen an autobiography detailing his exploits while cleverly casting the book as biography under another name?

A rare books collector says he has obtained a manuscript with new evidence that may give credence to that theory. The 200-page manuscript, "Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy," which dates to 1934, is twice as long as a previously known but unpublished novella of the same title by William T. Phillips, a machinist who died in Spokane in 1937.

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One-Child Policy a Surprising Boon for China Girls

Tsinghua University first-year student Mia Wang has confidence to spare.

Asked what her home city of Benxi in China's far northeastern tip is famous for, she flashes a cool smile and says: "Producing excellence. Like me."

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Germany Baulks at Euro Rescue, Insists on Rules

As Germany emerged from the destruction of World War II, it rebuilt its economy on a system of strong rules governing virtually every aspect of business, from auto manufacturing to competition among regional newspapers.

Today, the German economy is Europe's strongest, a regional powerhouse that its indebted neighbors depend on for billions of euros they need to cope their staggering indebtedness. Germany is insisting that they, too, adopt strict rules before it's prepared to release its money.

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Stocks Recover as Economic News Beats Hopes

World stocks started the week solidly amid hopes that the recent sharp volatility in the markets may have run its course following a run of stronger than anticipated economic data.

Though concerns remain over the state of the global economy and Europe's debt crisis, many investors think the recent sell-off has been overdone and are snapping up potential bargains.

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Autism Risks for Siblings are Higher Than Thought

A new study suggests nearly one in five children with an autistic older sibling will develop the disorder too — a rate much higher than previously thought.

Researchers followed 664 infants who had at least one older brother or sister with autism. Overall, 132 infants or about 19 percent ended up with an autism diagnosis, too, by their third birthdays. Previous smaller or less diverse studies reported a prevalence of between 3 percent and 14 percent.

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Future of Egypt's Ramadan Lanterns Under Threat

Tucked away in an alley in one of Cairo's oldest quarters, Nasser Mustafa painstakingly welds small metal pieces that will come together to form a traditional lantern.

Egyptians turn to the lantern, known as a fanoos, as part of the tradition of the holy month of Ramadan, when Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset in a process intended to light one's path toward prayer and God.

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