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Lab Clue to Caffeine Benefit on Alzheimer's

French and German researchers on Wednesday said they had found evidence in the lab to back theories that drinking caffeine has a preventive effect on Alzheimer's disease.

French and German researchers on Wednesday said they had found evidence in the lab to back theories that drinking caffeine has a preventive effect on Alzheimer's disease.

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'Zero Tolerance' Sweden Leaves Heavy Drug Users Behind

Sweden boasts one of Europe's lowest consumption of recreational drugs, but the same strict policy authorities consider key to success could also be pushing up the number of drug-related deaths.

Cocaine, ecstasy and even cannabis are rarely seen in streets and clubs in line with Sweden's official "zero tolerance" approach, whose ambitious target is clear.

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Fasting in the Land of Plenty: Germans Say Less is More

What to give the patient who has everything? Well-off Germans in Europe's top economy are increasingly deciding less is more and fasting to cure what ails them.

High-end clinics specializing in deprivation rather than pampering are all the rage in Germany, one of the homes of the fasting movement, and in some cases it is even covered by health insurance plans.

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'Kangaroo Care' Trumps Incubators for Colombian Babies

At Bogota's San Ignacio hospital, Cesar Algeciras often spends five hours straight in the neonatal intensive care unit, lovingly clutching his premature son to his bare chest.

"Feeling his heart beat is a delight," said the 36-year-old computer engineer. "Sometimes I don't even have to check the monitor to make sure he's fine."

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U.S. Recommends Aspirin for Some Pregnant Women

A small subset of pregnant women could benefit from taking low-dose aspirin to prevent the potentially life-threatening complication called pre-eclampsia, US health authorities said Tuesday.

Women with diabetes, chronic hypertension, those carrying multiple fetuses or who have a history of pre-eclampsia in prior pregnancies could benefit from starting a regimen of low-dose aspirin after their first trimester, said the US Preventive Services Task Force.

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Noses, Made in Britain: UK Touts Lab-Grown Organs

In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in a bold attempt to make body parts in the laboratory.

It's far from the only lab in the world that is pursuing the futuristic idea of growing organs for transplant. But the London work was showcased Tuesday as Mayor Boris Johnson announced a plan to attract more labs to do cutting-edge health and science research in the area.

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S.African Traditional Medicine Comes Under the Microscope

After decades in the shadows, South Africa's traditional "sangoma" healers are modernizing and becoming big business, raising questions about the need for strict regulation.

"Granny" Mahlasela Matcheke runs her practice from a squeaky clean white floor-tiled home in Johannesburg's up-and-coming Soweto township.

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MERS Fears Prompt ER Closure at Saudi Hospital

The main public hospital in the Saudi city of Jeddah has closed its emergency room after a rise in cases of the MERS virus among medical staff, the health ministry said Tuesday.

A Jeddah paramedic was among two more people Saudi health authorities reported on Sunday had died from the SARS-like disease, bringing the nationwide death toll to 66.

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U.N. Attacks Biting Bugs that Spread Diseases

Nobody likes mosquitoes, and the World Health Organization blames them for an array of diseases that kill a million people each year and threaten the health of half the world's people.

On World Health Day, WHO's executive director Jacob Kumaresan took aim at mosquitoes, flies, ticks and other biting bugs that spread malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis for causing "a silent disaster" worldwide. Most victims survive, he said, but often they suffer lifelong disability.

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U.N. Official Urges World to Tackle Unsafe Abortions

The head of the U.N. population agency said Monday that the world must address why 8.7 million young women aged 15 to 24 resort to unsafe abortions each year.

Babatunde Osotimehin also called on governments to explore why more than 200 million women in developing countries who want to prevent pregnancies don't have access to contraception. And he said countries must answer why one in three girls in developing countries are married before they turn 18, despite near universal commitment to ending child marriages.

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